Intelligent solutions to common plumbing hamilton problems

Intelligent solutions to common plumbing hamilton problems

Most common plumbing problems involve pipes. So remember that there are plumbing pipes made of different materials:

  1. Copper pipes, which come in three wall thicknesses: type K (thick), type L (medium) and type M (thin).
  2. Galvanized steel pipes, more resistant than copper, but can corrode over time.
  3. Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) pipes, which are usually used for water supply lines.
  4. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) piping, which is used for vent and waste piping. (Check local codes to make sure CPVC and PVC piping can be used in your area.)

For most common plumbing problems and repairs to the extent possible, use a replacement pipe that is the same as the existing pipe. If this is not possible, the inside diameter of the replacement pipe should be the same as the existing pipe which is also done the same by plumbing hamilton that are very qualified for plumbing issues.

Calculate Pipe Diameter

Use a steel tape measure to measure the inside diameter of the widest section of exposed pipe. If neither end is exposed, use a gauge or C-clamp to measure the outside diameter, and then consult a chart that relates the outside diameter to the inside diameter for the type of pipe you are using.

Measuring the Replacement Pipe

After removing the deteriorated tube and determining the inside diameter, buy a tube that is several inches longer than the one you need. To determine the proper length, use a steel tape measure or mark the new pipe section with a pencil. Place new fittings at the ends of the removed section, and be sure to include the depth of both fittings in the overall length.

How to Solder a Replacement Copper Pipe – According To Hamilton Plumber

One of the classic common plumbing problems. To fix it, close the main flow valve, and drain the system through the water heater or the lowest possible point in the house. Open a tap at the highest point to speed up drainage. Make sure the water heater (gas or electric) and any other equipment that could be affected by lack of water are turned off.

Adjust the pipe cutter around the pipe next to the cutting point. Turn the tube cutter knob until the tube is trapped between the rollers and the blade. Turn the tube cutter completely around the tube, tighten the knob further, and turn it around again. Repeat until the tube is almost cut, then peel it off with your hands. Insert the triangular blade attached to the pipe cutter at the cut ends of both pipe sections (old and new), and if any burrs remain, remove them says plumbing hamilton.

Place the new couplings and cut the tube to the proper length. Rub the inside of the couplings and the ends of both tubes (old and new) with emery cloth until shiny. If any grit remains on the surfaces, remove it.

Using a small hard brush, apply a thick, even coat of flux to all clean surfaces and inside the couplings. Dry the inside of the existing tubes, place the couplings over the cut ends, and rotate them a quarter turn so that the flux is evenly distributed.

Insert the new pipe section into one of the couplings, and carefully pull it toward you until you can insert the free end into the other coupling. Do not move the tube or couplings too much to prevent the flux from slipping off says an experienced plumber.

Weld the joint with a propane welder. Touch the edge of the joint with tin and apply heat to the center of the coupling.

The capillary action will draw the tin into the joint. Move the solder down along the coupling so that the tin penetrates and completely seals the connection. The solder should leave both tin and copper shiny. If one or the other looks discolored or brownish, remove the tube and couplings, clean them again and apply the flux.

How to repair the copper pipe section with a CPVC pipe

Many of the common plumbing problems involve repairing a copper pipe. To do this, remove the section of deteriorated copper pipe and remove the burr from both ends.

Hold the CPVC pipe section in the empty space; mark and cut the new section to the proper length with a metal saw and an angle cutter box. Using a sharp knife, remove the burr from the inside and bevel the outside of the ends of the CPVC pipe.

Loosen the knurled ends of the adapter couplings, and after cleaning the ends of the copper tube with an emery cloth, press the coupling against the copper tube until the tube is completely inside the coupling. Hand tighten both couplings.

Using a clean applicator or cloth, apply a coat of primer to the inside of each coupling and to the ends of the CPVC tubing. Allow primer to dry. With another applicator, apply a layer of CPVC cement to each coupling and to both ends of the pipe just like in hamilton plumbing.

Insert one end of the CPVC pipe into one of the couplings, and pull the free ends toward you until the other end can be inserted. Once the pipe is in place, rotate it a quarter turn to distribute cement evenly within the couplings. Do this quickly, as the cement sets in about 30 seconds. Remove excess cement.

Open the water supply. If there are leaks, tighten the couplings by hand, giving them a quarter turn.

How to repair a steel pipe – Tips by experienced Hamilton Plumber

The steel pipe is connected to threaded couplings which, once in place, cannot be removed without loosening the next pipe section. The joints are inserted into the piping system at regular intervals so that the sections can be removed.

If there is a joint near the damaged pipe section, remove it with two wrenches. Fasten the joint with one of the wrenches to secure the rest of the system. Use the other wrench to remove the pipe section.

If there is no close fitting, use a fine-toothed metal saw to cut the deteriorated section, and unscrew each section of the coupling.

Purchase two lengths of pipe and one joint. Once spliced, the combined length should be the same as the deteriorated pipe you removed. Ask your supplier to provide threads for the ends of the tubes.

Wrap sealing tape (1½ right turn) around the threaded ends, and screw one end of each pipe section into the corresponding coupling. Disassemble the union into its three pieces, and insert the ring nut into one of the pipe sections. Of the two union nuts, the end of that section will receive the smallest.

Screw the two union nuts to the ends of the pipe sections, deflecting the ends as necessary. Slide the ring nut toward the center of the joint, and screw it to the exposed threads of the larger joint to complete the connection. Fasten the exposed union nut, and tighten the ring nut with the other wrench.

Replacing a Steel Pipe with Copper Using Dielectric Joints

Remove the section of pipe that is deteriorated as described above. Measure and cut the replacement tube, leaving room for the couplings.

Use two dielectric joints, one at each end of the copper tube. These joints have a plastic collar and rubber washer that prevent different metals from contacting and corroding. Disassemble the joints, apply sealing tape, and screw the spigots into each end of the steel tube.

Hang the copper tube section from a joist with a tube hanger, and slide the ring nuts and plastic collars over it.

Prepare and weld the copper “shoulder” pieces from each dielectric joint to each end of the copper tube. Place the rubber washer against the front of the copper shoulder, thread the ring nut over the spigot and tighten by hand.