Top 10 Business Movies

Top 10 Business Movies

Cinema is, in theory, a reflection of society and human quality. Although, to be honest, most romantic comedies do not reflect real love, nor do action movies present physically possible scenarios, from time to time, the seventh art hits the mark in their portraits.

Films about business are not very abundant because they are not particularly “blockbuster”, but in a century of cinema there have been a few that are masterpieces of their genre.

Considered by many to be the best film in the history of cinema, Citizen Kane tells the life of the enigmatic business magnate Charles Foster Kane. The common thread is an investigation that a journalist carries out to find out what the last word the man said before he died means: Rosebud. Through research, you see the process of building a business empire and the high price of maintaining it.

  1. Orson Welles Citizen Kane (1941)

Considered by many to be the best film in the history of cinema, Citizen Kane tells the life of the enigmatic business magnate Charles Foster Kane. The common thread is an investigation that a journalist carries out to find out what the last word the man said before he died means: Rosebud. Through research, you see the process of building a business empire and the high price of maintaining it.
Kane’s character is based on the press mogul William Randolph Hearst, as well as Orson Wells himself.

  1. The Godfather: Part Two by Francis Ford Coppola (1972)

Hands down the best sequel ever, this movie is the exception to the “second parts were never good” rule. In fact, this part of the trilogy is often considered the best. The film tells two stories of the infamous Corleone family. On the one hand, we have Michael Corleone, played by Al Pacino, who is adjusting to his role as the new patriarch of the family. And on the other, we have the childhood and youth of Vito Corleone, his father, and the foundation of the crime family in New York. This film is the best cinematic example of the family business.

  1. It’s a Wonderful Life! by Frank Capra (1946)

One of the few films that shows the good side of the business, where the good guys, for once, win. It is a true Christmas classic that tells the story of George Bailey, a man who always had to sacrifice his dreams and ambitions for other people’s circumstances. Feeling unhappy, the man wishes to die, but then an angel arrives who shows him what would be the life of his relatives if he had not existed. In the end, George succeeds and his small business is afloat. A great film for all those with small and medium businesses that have to compete with the big giants in their sector.

  1. The Godfather by Francis Ford Coppola (1972)

“I will make you an offer that you cannot refuse” is one of many famous phrases that have become part of the collective knowledge. The Godfather tells the story of the Corleone family, especially that of Michael, the prodigal son who lived on the fringes of his father’s businesses but who is drawn into the world of the mafia to ensure the safety of his family. Quite a masterpiece about negotiations, power and trust.

  1. Network, an unforgiving world by Sidney Lumet (1976)

This film by the brilliant Sidney Lumet is one of the best descriptions of morality and success in the world of telecommunications. The story centers on the news anchor who, after being warned that he will soon lose his job due to lack of audience, decides to use the few minutes on the air that he has left to rant about life and the television industry. Ironically, his explosive farewell achieves spectacular numbers that make him an overnight success. A very entertaining example of the conflict between quality and success.

  1. The dilemma by Michael Mann (1999)

This film has some points in common with the previous one and tells the story of a biochemist who used to work for a large tobacco company and who decides to explain on television that his company began to put a substance in his tobacco to make it more addictive. Once again, the issue of morality in the media is discussed, but it also touches on conflicts of interest, as well as the power and influence of multinationals.

  1. Glengarry Glen Ross by James Foley (1992)

This movie is based on a play written by David Mamet who also wrote the script. And count the adventures of commission sellers. A real estate company challenges its employees: the one who sells the most will win a Cadillac, the second a collection of knives and the last one will be fired. From here, each seller has a different answer. Some jump into the challenge, while others resist the pressure. A classic for those who are dedicated to sales.

  1. Wall Street from Oliver Stone (1987)

“Money is everything”. Wall Steet is another one of those movies with stone quotes that we’ve heard hundreds of times. It tells the story of Gordon Gecko, played by Michael Douglas, a man who is carried away by the power of Wall Street until he becomes the worst version of himself. At the same time, we have Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen), a young man who aspires to follow in Gecko’s footsteps but discovers that his sense of ethics is not entirely compatible with the business model of the American stock market.

  1. Two Scammers and a Woman by Barry Levinson (1987)

This movie is a great example of competitiveness in business. It tells the story of two cold-door salespeople, Ernest and Bill, who sell the same product but work for competing companies. They demonstrate, on a small scale, the lengths to which you go to outperform your business competition. The ending, however, is ironic and satisfying at the same time. Both lose their licenses and decide that “unity is strength.”

  1. Modern Times of Charlie Chaplin (1936)

This film is the portrait of a distant time but that has ideas and thoughts that are as valid today as they were yesterday. Modern Times follows the misadventures of a worker during the time of the Great Depression when mechanization and chain labor shook all previous paradigms and forced people to make a complete mindset shift. As Darwin said, “Adapt or die.” You will not deny that this idea solves something familiar for us.